Cutting The Cable TV Cord

Cutting The Cable TV Cord

Posted by on Dec 28, 2013 in Dalies |

Thinking about cutting the cord? So what’s stopping you? Are tied to certain programming only available on cable? Or do you find that you really only watch a few programs from only a few different stations? We cut the cord over five years ago and haven’t regretted it yet. Yes, we still watch television, but we either get our programming from streaming sources online, or purchase disc sets from Amazon. For much of the “need to know” programming, the free, over-the-air channels still work well. But most of our programming now comes from Netflix and Amazon Prime – and really, both have the same content available for about the same price. Netflix has started to introduce more original programming. With Amazon Prime you get free two-day shipping. And both offer 30 days free trials. Some of our content is from YouTube (yes, quality shows can be found on YouTube), and some miscellaneous streaming sources from over-seas. Cable companies are starting to realize the masses are changing their viewing habit. Many cable companies are thinking about changing the model from the pay for bundled TV programming to becoming multi-channel video programming distributors (MVPDs). Basically means, these cable companies are looking to distribute content programming like Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, and others. Sounds great, doesn’t it? Well, yeah, it’s great for the end-consumer, but will reduce the money cable distributors make. So great for us, not so great for them. This will also create greater competition to supply content at a cheaper price (or will it?). For now, cable companies aren’t worried about losing money to cable cutters. In fact, may cable cutters that still use cable for their internet service still get basic cable services for free, simply because it’s oft times cheaper to leave the service on than to pay for an installer to go out and install a filter which blocks the TV channels. Plus, having TV subscribers look better on the bottom line rather than showing the increase number of Internet only cable subscribers. Strange, huh? We all want content, but we just don’t want to pay for 499 channels we don’t watch just so we can see that 1 channel. So as a consumer would you be willing to pay more for that one channel with content you want to see? And when you figure in the cost, you’ll find you will pay less for the programming you want to view, than getting that monthly cable bill. Most cable subscribers pay an average of $720 per year in the U.S. for some 180 channels. The average viewer may watch programming from 15 to 20 of those channels. For great programming from a variety of streaming sources, you would most certainly pay less. Even sports fans can find MLB and NFL related content online. You’ll may still have to use over-the-air broadcast to catch that live up...

Read More

New Low-Bandwidth Video Coding Standard

New Low-Bandwidth Video Coding Standard

Posted by on Nov 28, 2013 in Dalies |

With the increase in HD video resolution, the bandwidth required to deliver these better quality images increases as well. Think of it as trying to shove a watermelon down a garden hose. Short of having TARDIS technology where the inside of the pipe is bigger than the outside, there is only so much room to push that watermelon through. And with 4K video now making its way to mainstream that watermelon is even bigger. Compression techniques are used to deliver the same quality and use a smaller pipe to get that information to you more quickly. So find some efficient way to make that watermelon small enough to fit down that garden hose, but give it back to you in its full beauty is a real challenge. Most all compression is “lossy” and must sacrifice something to send all that additional information. That’s why many of your cable, satellite broadcast, Internet, etc. videos may not look as clean as the original source – they compress all the flavor out of that watermelon. The video and audio has been compressed a lotso it’ll fix down the pipe available. And with most broadband providers putting caps on how much you can receive in any given day, that pipe is getting smaller, too. Fortunately the guys and gals at the International Television Union (ITU – the standards creators) look at all this stuff and come up with a new High Efficiency Video Coding standard (HEVC) which is designed to deliver high-quality, low-bandwidth video. It’s this new HEVC/H.265 standard that is touted as needing ½ as much bandwidth as the current H.264 standard. That’s the good news. However, it will take a several years to get this new standard into all the places that create the content you view. The cable company, for example, is still trying to get out of the even older standard MPEG-2 (lots more compression and “lossy”) equipment. Expect the Internet to more quickly adopt this new standard since more-and-more content delivery is moving to the web. Especially if you consider that NetFlix, which showed off 4K delivery at CES, will need to get that 4K image into your home will require some new and improved compression like mentioned...

Read More

Stuff

Posted by on Oct 20, 2013 in Home Page |

DMM New Site and Services   Drudge Multimedia launches a new site design with the new company changes working toward creating quality web sites, video production, graphics and more. From logo design to print pieces to web and video, we will cover all your marketing needs. Choose only the services you want. Start small and grow. If you are looking for logo creation or business cards, then we can do that. If you are looking for video services, we can handle the entire process from creation to uploading the video onto your website. Find out what we can do for you. Let Us Help Build Your Site   DMM is here to help you remodel or do a complete web rebuild. We will help you redo your site as a fully functional website with your branding in a Content Management System that suits your needs. If you want full control over the content, you’ll have it with no strings attached! We’ll clearly lay out what you need, and only what you need that fits your budget. Or, if you prefer, we can manage your site, work on your Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and more for a monthly fee. We’ll help keep your site up to date with as little or as much involvement that you may want. And, you have complete confidence in knowing you can change your mind at any time. Want to do some of the work yourself, move your site, whatever. It’s your content regardless as to how much we may do for you. Contact Us and see what we can do for...

Read More

Come On and Zoom, Zoom, Zoom On Zoom…

Come On and Zoom, Zoom, Zoom On Zoom…

Posted by on Aug 11, 2013 in Dalies |

Whether to zoom or not to zoom when shooting your masterpiece. That is the question often a Videographer or Director of Photography must ask when out shooting that masterpiece project. Most film schools have always taught one to use prime lenses only and to never zoom. Sure, a zoom lens has its place – doing a slow push in or out of a scene, but what about using that zoom as a variable prime? Zoom lenses have had a bad rap for a long time, but zoom lenses today, even stock zooms on the most inexpensive camera have improved greatly over the parent predecessor. Top professional movie DPs will even use a zoom lens in their shooting over a prime. (Ridley Scott for example – “Alien”, “Blade Runner”, “Legend”, etc.) A zoom lens can be a great tool you can use to change your shot without having to move everything just to get that perfect framing. If one watches the image closely and tests the limits of the lens, one can find the sweet range of the zoom and live within those constraints to get the best picture possible for every shot without having to resort to only prime shooting. Today’s zooms are sharp, fast and can be a fast way to get that framing for a great shot – especially when it’s not practical to strike and move everything to the “perfect spot”. So get out there and...

Read More